Gold Out Game to assist cause to end childhood cancer

Gold Out Game to assist cause to end childhood cancer

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At 6:30 p.m. on Thursday at Cy-Fair FCU Stadium, the Cy Springs Panthers and Katy Taylor Mustangs will combine forces to join the fight to abolish childhood cancer with a Gold Out football game. For their first home game of the season, the Panthers will help raise money and spread awareness by selling Teaming Up To Fight Childhood Cancer T-shirts, and wearing them to the game.

“To me this affects the average of the population that we work with, which high school kids and kids in general,'' said athletic trainer Dustin Cedidla. “I think it’s important to do what we can to help in any way.”

September is considered nationwide as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. Every year, 15,780 children under 21 years of age are diagnosed with cancer; approximately one-fourth of them will not survive the disease, according to Teaming Up to Fight Childhood Cancer. Non-profit charitable organizations like the American Childhood Cancer Organization provide helpful information on cancer treatment and services, as well as advocating for childhood cancer patients, survivors and families. Communities throughout the country help out by hosting charities and donating to research institutions, much like the Cy Fair and Katy school districts are contributing to their own.

“Gold Out week is important to us because the kids are out there suffering from cancer don't deserve it; they deserve a normal life like us, " said junior varsity player Robert Escamilla. "We make it important because we are about those kids sitting in the hospital room going through chemotherapy to kill the cancer, but we want to donate so that they can afford chemotherapy and come home."

TUTFCC was founded five years ago by Kelly Pickel and Angel Miller after Pickel’s son Gunner went into limb salvage surgery. Over the last four years, they have raised over $250,000 that has gone directly to Children Cancer Research. The Gold Out T-shirts will be $10.00 each, with $7.00 proceeds going straight to CCR. During the game, donations will be taken and given to Pediatric Cancer Research.

“I just hope that we keep awareness of this all the time and not just September,” said Cedidla. “These kids are getting diagnosed every day, every month. It’s not just a September thing; it’s year round.”

By Lillian Gonzalez

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